3D tomography


3D tomography of HT-29 (a) A measured z-slice (top), a cross-section at the area indicated by the red box (bottom left) and a zoomed-in image of the area indicated by the yellow box (bottom right), measured using a ×63/1.4 NA oil immersion objective. (b) A deconvolved z-slice corresponding to the measurement shown in a (top), a cross-section at the area indicated by the red box (bottom left) and a zoomed-in image of the area indicated by the yellow box (bottom right). By comparing a and b, the resolution increase can be clearly seen. (c) False-colour three-dimensional rendering of the deconvolution result (Supplementary Movie 3). We used z-stacks of 140 images, each with a dimension of 640 × 640. Owing to the large image dimension, the image is split into 25 sub-images for faster deconvolution. Overall, the deconvolution process took approximately an hour. Scale bars in all panels, 5 µm. (T. Kim, R. Zhou, M. Mir, S. D. Babacan, P. S. Carney, L. L. Goddard and G. Popescu, White-light diffraction tomography of unlabelled live cells, Nature Photonics (2014))

Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM) for tomographic imaging and 3D analysis of live cells. Tomography of unlabeled live cells is obtained by scanning the focus through the sample, and sequentially taking a stack of image slices along the cell. The obtained stack holds full-3D information of the object, which can be processed further to obtain information regarding the structure and spatial distribution of the object. 3D rendering of the image stack is done on ImageJ to provide a full and flexible view of a cell. Based on the quantitative phase images, this capability expands the applications of SLIM to science and clinic to another dimension.

 

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